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Related Resources


Forage d’eau: vers la professionnalisation d’un secteur

Ce document porte à la fois sur les forages mécanisés et sur les forages manuels, ainsi que sur la remise en état de puits, mais n’aborde pas le développement social et communautaire, l’exploitation et l’entretien, ni les chaînes d’approvisionnement. La première partie du rapport analyse le contexte sous-jacent au rôle de l’UNICEF dans le secteur du forage, y compris la remise en état de puits existants, et expose les principaux enjeux liés à la professionnalisation du secteur et à la prise en compte des ressources en eaux souterraines. La seconde partie fournit des recommandations aux bureaux de pays de l’UNICEF en vue d’améliorer la professionnalisation du secteur du forage mécanisé et manuel, et de la remise en état des puits en Afrique, au moyen d’actions pratiques et plus stratégiques pour l’UNICEF et ses partenaires. Enfin, cette note d’orientation comporte également des exemples concrets de mesures déjà adoptées et des liens vers des références pertinentes. | »

Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Handbook for Extension Workers, Vol. 2

This Handbook is intended for the use by extension staff and workers of local government and other development actors, such as NGOs and CBOs, providing services in communities. An extension staff can be broadly defined as a person responsible for dissemination of new approaches and technologies, developing effective and efficient management systems, and community mobilisation. Extension workers link the community to the technical team at higher level to provide specific technical input.

The main purpose of this handbook is to enable extension workers or agents to facilitate communities in the selection of the water and sanitation services they need to ensure these services are properly operated, maintained, and sustained by the communities. | »

Handbook on rainwater harvesting storage options

This handbook is intended to be a practical reference guide on rainwater harvesting storage options for technical personnel, skilled masons and social workers involved in promoting the collection of rainwater at household, community and institutional levels. | »

Gender and rural water services – lessons from RWSN members Summary of RWSN E-discussion on how women’s engagement in Water User Committees impact on its performance and system functionality (2016) and RWSN Webinars: Making Water Work for Women, Sharing Inspiring Experiences (May 2017)

Gender relations are critical to nearly every aspect of rural water supply, but rarely addressed in practice by rural water professionals. All water supply programmes affect men and women in different ways, and while practitioners assume their work will benefit women, how do they know whether it will or not, how do they know what impact it will have?

In 2016 RWSN’s Mapping and Monitoring Theme members had an impromptu and rich e-discussion on gender equality and WASH. In early 2017, RWSN’s Equality, Non Discrimination and Inclusion (ENDI) Theme launched a call to their members for examples of inspiring experiences of ‘Making Water Work for Women’. Both discussions have been rich with experiences from across Asia, Africa and Latin America, and reinforcing of each other. We have put together a short brief highlighting the key points from these discussions:

- The nature of female participation within water committees should be discussed in terms of quality as well as quantity. If women’s roles do not offer any opportunity to influence committee decisions and outcomes, their participation is largely tokenistic. Qualitative indicators can help to show whether women’s participation is tokenistic, or active and meaningful.
- High-level government commitment to minimum quotas for women’s participation was seen as a crucial prerequisite to creating the space for the inclusion of women and the ability to demand it.
- Where women were more influential on Water User Committees, it was strongly attributed to the special efforts of implementing organisations who worked on mobilising women and increasing their confidence and awareness about the work involved, and sensitising men equally to create space for women’s involvement in the committees, as the example in India shows.
- By working closely with women and men together it is possible to challenge gender norms amongst women and men in rural communities, so that they begin to share unpaid work associated with WASH more equally, as the example in Ethiopia shows.
- Identifying the agents of change (women and men) from the community who are motivated and determined to advocate for water and sanitation can nurture lifelong advocates, as illustrated by the experience from Bangladesh.
- Disaggregating monitoring indices by gender can help to raise gender equality as a priority, and set specific expectations about the participation of women in different aspects of service provision.
- Conflict-sensitive approaches to water and sanitation can help to facilitate peace building by creating a platform for women around a common need, as in the example from India. | »

Harnessing water point data to improve drinking water services

This document introduces what water point data are, why they are collected, and how they are used in “The Value of Water Point Data”. The chapter “A Deep Dive: The Case of Uganda” illustrates the use and progressive improvement of water point data in a country that is actively updating and publishing its National Water Atlas.

“From Water Point Data to Improved Water Services” provides an overview of how water point data can be used more effectively to measure services and water resources, strengthen the enabling environment, and improve coordination. It also reviews some innovative approaches under development, such as the remote monitoring of water points. Finally, “Recommendations” provides actionable guidance to a) national governments, b) local governments, c) NGOs and implementers, and d) donors and investors. | »

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