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Gender and rural water services – lessons from RWSN members Summary of RWSN E-discussion on how women’s engagement in Water User Committees impact on its performance and system functionality (2016) and RWSN Webinars: Making Water Work for Women, Sharing Inspiring Experiences (May 2017)

Gender relations are critical to nearly every aspect of rural water supply, but rarely addressed in practice by rural water professionals. All water supply programmes affect men and women in different ways, and while practitioners assume their work will benefit women, how do they know whether it will or not, how do they know what impact it will have?

In 2016 RWSN’s Mapping and Monitoring Theme members had an impromptu and rich e-discussion on gender equality and WASH. In early 2017, RWSN’s Equality, Non Discrimination and Inclusion (ENDI) Theme launched a call to their members for examples of inspiring experiences of ‘Making Water Work for Women’. Both discussions have been rich with experiences from across Asia, Africa and Latin America, and reinforcing of each other. We have put together a short brief highlighting the key points from these discussions:

- The nature of female participation within water committees should be discussed in terms of quality as well as quantity. If women’s roles do not offer any opportunity to influence committee decisions and outcomes, their participation is largely tokenistic. Qualitative indicators can help to show whether women’s participation is tokenistic, or active and meaningful.
- High-level government commitment to minimum quotas for women’s participation was seen as a crucial prerequisite to creating the space for the inclusion of women and the ability to demand it.
- Where women were more influential on Water User Committees, it was strongly attributed to the special efforts of implementing organisations who worked on mobilising women and increasing their confidence and awareness about the work involved, and sensitising men equally to create space for women’s involvement in the committees, as the example in India shows.
- By working closely with women and men together it is possible to challenge gender norms amongst women and men in rural communities, so that they begin to share unpaid work associated with WASH more equally, as the example in Ethiopia shows.
- Identifying the agents of change (women and men) from the community who are motivated and determined to advocate for water and sanitation can nurture lifelong advocates, as illustrated by the experience from Bangladesh.
- Disaggregating monitoring indices by gender can help to raise gender equality as a priority, and set specific expectations about the participation of women in different aspects of service provision.
- Conflict-sensitive approaches to water and sanitation can help to facilitate peace building by creating a platform for women around a common need, as in the example from India. | »

What’s Working, Where, and for How Long A 2016 Water Point Update to the RWSN (2009) statistics

• An average of 78% of water points are functional across the 11 countries analyzed.

• The high failure rates early after installation are troubling: almost 15% after one year and 25% of water points are non-functional by their fourth year after installation. This indicates widespread problems with poor quality water point installation, due to a range of problems that may include professionalism and skills around contracts, construction and supervision; borehole siting; lack of quality control of hardware; or lack of post-construction monitoring and problem resolution.

• Handpumps are often singled out as technology that fails, but analysis of other water point types show similar functionality levels, and that tens of thousands of handpumps are providing a service

This poster was peer-reviewed and presented at the 7th RWSN Forum in Abidjan, Cote'Ivoire 2016.

It replaces "Handpump Data 2009 Selected Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa" (2009) | »

Community management of water points: more problem than solution? RWSN Dgroups discussion synthesis

This note summarizes some of the broad points of a June 2017 RWSN blog written by Dr Ellie Chowns on communitybased management (CBM) and the ensuing discussion on the RWSN Sustainable Services DGroup, to which many RWSN members contributed .

CBM is the prevalent management model for rural water supply. So what are the issues?
• Lack of accountability: Community management enables government officials and donors alike to abdicate responsibility for ensuring long-term sustainable water services.
• Inefficiency and lack of sustainability: Preventive maintenance is almost never done, repairs are often slow and sub-standard, and committees are unable to collect and save funds.
• Disempowerment: CBM reinforces existing community power relations, thereby breeding conflict rather than strengthening social capital.
• Lack of scalability and dependence on external support: The CBM model has never reliably worked at any scale but is continued due to a lack of viable, or proven alternative. One can always find 'successful' case studies of where it has worked fantastically well – but these tend to be isolated systems, reliant on constant | »

Delivering Universal and Sustainable Water Services Partnering with the Private Sector

The objective of this Guidance Note is to offer practical, experience-based guidance to those considering or currently
engaging in PPP in the water sector, and to provide a basic understanding of water PPPs and the PPP cycle to better
inform dialogue with governments that are considering PPP arrangements.

It builds on the experience of WSP in supporting PPP reforms in developing countries, especially through the domestic private sector. Key stakeholders in this dialogue include government at all levels, service providers, policy makers, customers, civil society, and professionals.

Many water PPP engagements in developing countries are more domestically oriented and at a smaller scale than international transactions. This Note outlines a rationale and approach for launching a water sector PPP so that government leaders and private sector providers can have informed discussions about the path forward should they choose to explore this approach in their countries. | »

Proceedings and report from the 7th RWSN Forum (2016, Abidjan) Contributions et rapport du 7ème Forum RWSN (2016, Abidjan)

The 2016 Rural Water Supply Network Forum in Abidjan was the first global gathering to consider the practical challenge of how everyone worldwide can get access to safe, affordable water by 2030. It was also the first RWSN Forum to take place in a francophone country, in the 25 years since the creation of the network.
The Forum took place on 29 Nov - 2 Dec 2016, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire, and gathered 467 rural water sector practitioners from over 300 organisations from 64 countries in Africa, Asia, Americas, and Europe, in a bilingual (English/French) four day event. It was opened by the Prime Minister of Côte d’Ivoire, Mr Daniel Kaplan Duncan. We were joined by HE State Minster James Dengchol Tot, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Electricity of Ethiopia, as well as a delegation from AMCOW.

Le Forum du Rural Water Supply Network 2016 à Abidjan était le premier évènement global à considerer les défis liés à l’approvisionnement en eau potable et abordable pour tous d’ici 2030 d’un point de vue pratique. C’était également le premier à avoir lieu dans un pays francophone depuis la creation du réseau il y a 25 ans.
Le Forum a réuni 467 professionnels du secteur de l’eau rurale de 300 organisations et de 64 pays d’Afrique, Asie, Amérique, et de l’Europe, pendant 4 jours en deux langues (anglais et français). La cérémonie d’ouverture a été présidée par le Premier minister de Côte d’Ivoire, Mr Daniel Kaplan Duncan. Son Excellence le Ministre d’Etat James Dengchol Tot, Ministre de l’Eau, Irrigation et Electricité en Ethiopie, ainsi qu’une délégation de AMCOW.

The Forum proceedings compiles all peer-reviewed materials. Separate downloads and links to the films can be found at: https://rwsn7.net/content/
Le documents sur les contributions du Forum rassemble tous les articles évalués. Pour les télécharger et visualiser les films, veuillez vous référer à https://rwsn7.net/content/

The RWSN Forum report gives an overview of the Forum programme and its organisation, including the highlights from the presentations, networking events, exhibition, media coverage and synthesis.
Le rapport du Forum donne un aperçu du programme du Forum et de son organisation, y compris les points forts des présentations, des évènements de réseautage, de l'expo, de la couverture médiatique et de la synthèse. | »

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